Posts From Adam O'Dell - December 0 - page 57

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Economy

A Number We Trust

The Bureau of Labor Statistics non-farm payroll (NFP) report is often a market mover. But should it be? Both non-farm payrolls and the unemployment rate can be very misleading. After

Economy

It’s Time to Be Wary… Very Wary

Take a look at this… What do you see?   Don’t worry. It’s not a Rorschach inkblot test. It’s a sign of weakness. Let me explain… Technical analysts look at

Economy

Hospitals and Toilets

Nothing is certain but – yeah, yeah – death and taxes. But what about hospitals and toilets? Well, let’s look at the certainty of hospitals today (we’ll tackles toilets another

Economy

It’s a Sign of Speculation

Home prices are falling…still. Demand is weak… still. So you’d expect homebuilder share prices to be trolling the bottom… still. Right? Not so fast. This chart below shows the recovery

Economy

The Financial Planning Rule of Thumb

We’ve all been suckered into participating in a magic trick before. My favorite starts like this: “Pick a number… any number.” It continues: “Now double that number… then divide it

Economy

Beyond the Numbers: To Rent or To Buy

Two charts today… First, we see the Rental Vacancy Rate has made a straight-line drop since 2009, decreasing by 10% in just three years. Next, we see the Bloomberg Apartment

Economy

Stealing From Customers to Pay Shareholders

This June marks five years since the financial sector’s XLF fund peaked. Let’s see how several of the “dead men walking” have fared since then. The chart below shows the

Economy

"What I Love To Do" No Longer Cuts It

Math quiz: what is the Return on Investment (ROI) of higher education, funded with student loans, if a graduate can’t find a job? Answers: a) 8 – 10% per year

Economy

Interest rates bottom, TBF moves higher

Look at this chart. It shows the ProShares Short 20+ Year Treasury ETF (NYSE: TBF). As an inverse fund, TBF goes higher when interest rates go higher and bond prices

Economy

Where Theory and Reality Don't Mes

Rodney points out the key paradox of pension obligation: contributions should increase when interest rates are low. That’s because retirement nest eggs can only grow in two ways: 1. From