Make This Christmas Count, Because Next Year Might Not Be So Jolly

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It’s Christmas. It’s the time of year when everyone feels their best. Even the markets tend to perform better (though that isn’t the case this year).

But for the most part, it’s a time of spiritual reflection and giving.

The principle of giving is integral to transcending our most basic mode of survival…

On your death bed you likely won’t be counting your money or possessions. Rather, you’ll be reflecting on your relationship with people and God, whoever that may be for you or however you define it. You’ll remember how you helped and served others.

Of course, giving alone does little more than relieve the ego… it helps us feel connected to others and the greater principle of being. But many forms of giving don’t actually serve others. Give a man a fish… you know.

That’s why, if you’re going to give, do so in a way that actually improves the well-being of the recipient. Don’t just give them temporary pleasure or relief.

For those simply giving to a cause, most of that money filters to the very corrupt political and mafia-like powers that conspire to keep their people poor.

Which reminds me of another saying: “The pathway to Hell is paved with good intentions.”

Just like the failure of most economists, who insist on treating the symptoms rather than the underlying problems, the very act of giving itself only makes the person more dependent and weaker.

And yet that’s the world we live in today.

Since 2009, the Fed and central banks from around the world have been stimulating their economies so no one has to suffer another financial crisis again.

For 2016, economists are giving their year-end predictions, saying the stock market will be marginally higher, that housing will inch higher, and that the Fed will deliver two or three small interest rate hikes.

That’s what everyone wants to hear… but we continue to say the unpopular thing.

You don’t get something for nothing.

That’s what we’ve gotten for several years now: $10 trillion+ in global money printed out of thin air to offset the greatest (and most global) debt crisis, deflation and depression since the 1930s.

Stocks continue to defy gravity, although they have gone nowhere since November 2014 – and that’s what happens. Bubbles keep expanding, overtaking everything in their paths, until they burst so violently that they destroy debt, wealth, businesses and jobs faster than ever.

The markets are on crack, and they will end like every crack addict in history – in detox.

So this Christmas, give the gift of financial wisdom to your loved ones.

Help them to preserve their wealth and income in what could be the greatest financial crisis… and the greatest sale on financial assets… of a lifetime.

If you missed out on the gains of the past several years because you, like me, were wary of the negligent policies of these central banks, don’t worry. Preserving your wealth, income and assets will allow you, your family and business to prosper in their years ahead.

It’s by protecting yourself that you will have a Merry Christmas today and for years to come. And that’s what we wish for you.

So take it in. Give your loved ones a hug, pop the cork, sing a song, or do whatever Christmas ritual you have or make up a new one. Next year I don’t think will be so jolly… but you’ll be prepared.


Harry

Follow me on Twitter @harrydentjr

What Killed the Middle Class?

Our middle class has been shrinking substantially since the 1960s and ’70s. Today, their share of wealth is the lowest in the world!

Much of the blame is placed squarely on the shoulders of the cheap Chinese manufacturing jobs and the flood of illegal immigrants into the U.S. workforce.

But what’s the real reason?

In our latest infographic, What Killed the Middle Class? we take a look at some of the most shocking numbers showing how bad it’s really become, exactly what’s been fueling this middle-class revolt and the dangers that lie ahead.

 

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Categories: Economy

About Author

Harry studied economics in college in the ’70s, but found it vague and inconclusive. He became so disillusioned by the state of the profession that he turned his back on it. Instead, he threw himself into the burgeoning New Science of Finance, which married economic research and market research and encompassed identifying and studying demographic trends, business cycles, consumers’ purchasing power and many, many other trends that empowered him to forecast economic and market changes.