No One Is Considering the Obvious

The way the Malaysian government and Malaysia Air are handling the disappearance of flight 370 is another classic example of how people go into denial when something shocking happens. They don’t want to face it.

Planes don’t disappear out of thin air very often. And when they do, the consequences tend to be catastrophic.

The possibility that this plane was intentionally hijacked was not even mentioned until the eighth day. Even worse… they acted like it was a major new insight, even though evidence of this came out very early on, from radar and satellites and from other governments and agencies.

According to the data, the plane went sharply off course, changed altitudes drastically and likely flew for several hours afterward. Then it was determined that the communications system and the transponder had been deliberately turned off before the “all right, good night” communication.

You don’t have to be Kojak to figure out what really happened …

Instead, the Malaysian government and airline acted more like Inspector Clouseau. They wanted to believe the plane blew up suddenly, so they held on to that assumption until it was no longer tenable from increasing evidence.

Why? If the plane blew up, then it wouldn’t be the fault of the pilots or the crew. We wouldn’t have to blame Malaysian security for letting on two people with stolen passports. The fault would be with Boeing or Rolls Royce, and who better to blame than two big, evil Western corporations.

Denial is a powerful force in human psychology, and it’s the same reason that almost no one sees the very obvious and increasingly extreme bubble that is building in stocks currently. Janet Yellen… Warren Buffett… most economists and financial analysts… none of them see it, and that is incredible blindness to me.

Being objective and stepping back — as I do when I look at the economy — I see two likely scenarios. The first is that the plane crashed after a struggle in the cockpit. This would explain why the plane suddenly rose to 45,000 feet and then fell to 23,000 feet.

But there’s one glaring problem with this theory: the radar indicated that the plane continued flying for another six to seven hours. Not to mention, the plane clearly veered off course after the altitude change, and there have been no signs of wreckage whatsoever. If there had been a wreck that close to Malaysia, it would have been much easier to find.

The second, more obvious scenario to me is one that no one has mentioned, at least not that I have heard. The plane was simply stolen. The sudden ascent to 45,000 feet, followed by the plunge to 23,000 feet could have been done to literally knock the passengers out or even kill them. That way the hijackers could quickly get everyone under control.

Think about it… if someone wanted to steal an entire plane, they sure wouldn’t want a whole bunch of witnesses around to rat them out. Those people would have to be eliminated or hidden for a long time.

But the real mystery is why would someone want to steal a large, long range jet? They couldn’t sell it… there’s no way they’d get away with it. They couldn’t fly it around for military or commercial purposes… they’d be detected immediately now that everyone in the world is looking for this plane.

And don’t forget… there have been no ransom demands for the plane or its passengers. No demand to trade for prisoners or something like that. There also haven’t been any claims by terrorist groups. Think of the publicity they’d get for their idiotic cause. Why do something on this scale and then keep quiet about it?

So that leaves one obvious motive, and again it’s one that no one is talking about.

The plane was stolen, so it could be used as a weapon. Think about it… some crazy terrorist could load up this large, long range plane with fuel and explosives and fly it into a major building. Duh!

And of course they’d steal it from a country like Malaysia. There’s a much better chance of getting away with it than if they tried stealing it from a country like the U.S. that has super-good intelligence and security.

In this scenario, they would want it to seem like the plane just disappeared. That way they could hide it until they were ready to execute their plan.

Then, once everyone has shifted focus to the next stupid thing Justin Bieber is doing, the hijackers could fly their one deadly suicide flight. With a plane that can fly 7,700 miles, they could hit London, New York or Washington, D.C., from wherever they’re hiding it.

It would be 9/11 all over again!

Tell me that doesn’t seem like the most likely scenario. Even if it’s a remote one, then our intelligence agencies in Europe and the U.S. should be on high alert. Let’s hope they are!

When’s a likely time for such an event to occur? Maybe about a month from now, in late April, when the search dies down.

The more this continues to be a mystery, the more likely this scenario… wanted to warn you, just in case…

Harry

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Categories: Foreign Markets

About Author

Harry studied economics in college in the ’70s, but found it vague and inconclusive. He became so disillusioned by the state of the profession that he turned his back on it. Instead, he threw himself into the burgeoning New Science of Finance, which married economic research and market research and encompassed identifying and studying demographic trends, business cycles, consumers’ purchasing power and many, many other trends that empowered him to forecast economic and market changes.