Do you remember the good old days? When I was a kid, the family who lived too far to visit often would send me birthday and Christmas cards. The Christmas cards were my favorite. They were often filled with money or a Toys R Us gift card.

In school, they encouraged us find a pen pal. They taught us how to address the envelope, write a letter, then send it off – a skill I’m sure the younger generation no longer possesses.

Do you remember those days?

Days when we had to write letters, not type them. When phone calls were preferred over text messages. When popping in unannounced for coffee was still acceptable.

I’d like to hear your stories. Share them with me at economyandmarkets@dentresearch.com.

I still remember the first “important” letter I wrote…

I was about 10 or 11 at the time. My parents had bought me a game for my new Sony PlayStation 2. After I’d dumped hours of my Christmas vacation into the digital space, I began thinking about how the game could be so much better…

So, I wrote a letter to Bandai Namco, the games’ developer.

Roughly two months later, I got a response. They thanked me for writing, for my ideas, and for my passion, but unfortunately, they couldn’t implement my suggestions due to legal issues.

Of course, I was disappointment, but still excited that I’d gotten any response at all.

Nowadays, you’re lucky to reach a human when attempting to contact a company for any reason as all.

Of course, technology has been beneficial to us. It’s forwarded medicines, means of production — even though it removed a demand for jobs in certain sectors — and it has granted us the ability to gather information at the touch of a button. It’s also made the world a smaller place (from a communications perspective).

But with the rise of technology, there has also been a loss. I’ve touched on this before.

Children are being exposed to the different media sites at younger ages each year. One young girl, Coco, was only six years old when she became an Instagram sensation. That kind of exposure isn’t healthy for the young ego… or for any aged ego.

And while communication is easier than ever, people are becoming increasingly socially inept because their experience is online and not face to face. Does anyone in the younger generation even go to the bar to meet new people anymore?

Tweet, Tweet

And nowadays we watch the social media platforms like vultures circling a dying animal…

Like it or not, Trump has become the “god” of Twitter. His rhetoric fits with the 280-characters-or-less Twitter mentality. The fact that he has 53.7 million followers says it all…

It’s a realm where fact is hard to separate from fiction due to the amount of information that is available at the tips of our fingers.

But here at Dent Research, we’re only concerned with the facts.

As of now, the U.S. economy is (mostly) stable. How long it will stay that way, though, is in question. And it’s a question Rodney has tackled a few times in Economy & Markets, and most recently in the October issue of Boom & Bust.

The mid-term election is concerning…

The trade war is concerning… Both Harry and Rodney have written about this recently, here and here.

For now, we watch… and we wait (while remembering those good old days)…

Here’s What You Missed…

Get Ready for Gold to Bounce Once More
By Harry Dent, Founder, Dent Research

You know by now that I think gold is above all a commodity, and in a bubble that was more extreme than stocks… a bubble that’s been bursting since September 2011, but…

The Fed’s Newest Double Standard
By Rodney Johnson, Senior Editor, Economy & Markets

Collectively, we just got screwed again, and I bet most people didn’t even know it. It happens so many times, particularly at the hands of the Federal Reserve, it’s hard to keep track.

The Fed Makes No News
By Lance Gaitan, Editor, Treasury Profits Accelerator

There were no surprises from the Federal Reserve today.

Top 10 Cities Pricing the Middle Class Out of Real Estate
By Harry Dent, Founder, Dent Research

Right now, the American dream of owning a home is getting further and further out of reach for much of the middle class.

That’s all for this week.

Take care, take care.