“Reports of My Death Have NOT Been Greatly Exaggerated!” Regards, Retail

The retail apocalypse coming to a mall near you

Is this retail apocalypse you’ve been hearing so much about a reality?

Is this really the end for the American shopping mall?

Yes! And it’s going to get worse, but I want you to see why it was totally predictable.

In fact, just like we forecast that Harley Davidson would suffer, so too did we forecast that retail stores would take a hit with the predictability of spending waves!

Yes, the retail, brick-and-mortar, industry is suffering because there are too many stores, online shopping is growing exponentially and shoppers are “moving toward experience…”

And yes, internet retailers like Amazon are disrupting shopping malls and big-box stores.

It’s competitive capitalism, and it’s the reason we live in a wealthy country today.

But there’s something so much bigger than all of these things going on, and everyone seems to be missing.

All the retail store closings and bankruptcies were baked into the cake because of a massive demographic trend that peaked in late 2007.

As enormous as e-commerce has become… and as quickly as it continues to grow, it’s nothing compared to the role demographics has played in dictating the fate of the retail economy.

With clothing retail stores like Macy’s and JCPenny sucking more and more wind, how much longer will they be able to tread water? And is there any relief on the horizon?

In our latest infographic, The End of Retail as We Know it, we dive deep into the decline of the retail industry and reveal how a culprit even larger than Amazon, has buried retail stores everywhere and why you’ll see even more consolidation in the years ahead.

What Killed the Middle Class?

Today real incomes of the middle class are 5% lower than they were in 1970 and 12.4% lower than in 2000… when they peaked! How could this be?

In our new infographic What Killed the Middle Class?, we take a look at some shocking numbers to show how bad it’s become and what has been fueling this middle-class revolt.

 

LEARN MORE
Categories: Markets

About Author

Harry studied economics in college in the ’70s, but found it vague and inconclusive. He became so disillusioned by the state of the profession that he turned his back on it. Instead, he threw himself into the burgeoning New Science of Finance, which married economic research and market research and encompassed identifying and studying demographic trends, business cycles, consumers’ purchasing power and many, many other trends that empowered him to forecast economic and market changes.